laurie kennedy msw betting

how big is sports betting industry

Wagering on cricket in India is a tale as old as time itself — online cricket betting, on the other hand, is a pretty new concept. Have you had any luck betting on Big Bash this year? Ok, so we absolutely love cricket. Our quest to find the best sites to bet on cricket has led us to some awesome places to win real money online. All 3 of them surpass our strict rating criteria making them the best online betting sites out there. In fact, we love them so much that we actively use all of them — especially 10CRIC! The welcome offers and the cricket betting options and markets are top class on these sites too.

Laurie kennedy msw betting toto sports betting websites

Laurie kennedy msw betting

Use your powers for good. Class of Speaker Tracye A. Polson, Ph. Her post-graduate training includes a psychoanalytic research fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center and completion of the Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Program at the Baltimore Washington Institute for Psychoanalysis. Currently, Dr. She serves on the advisory board for Teens Stand Together, a new local non-profit aimed at eliminating teen bullying.

She was co-president of the doctoral student organization when in residence at Smith College. Dissertation Titles Babushkin, Anton Therapeutic Alliance: Measuring education outcomes as students progress through an M. Cole, Shawneladee C. Darrell, Linda P. Kelly, Amber R. Trauma-Informed Mindfulness Based on Stress Reduction: Development of model and an application with sample of women who have survived interpersonal trauma. Linnman, Jennifer Polson, Tracye A. Class of Speaker Kaitlin Smith, M.

As the waters rise, for example, we do not yet know what latent struggles will bubble to the surface, what new solidarities will emerge, and how the form and even the concept of social services may need to be radically reconfigured.

Kaitlin also served on the Anti-Racism Consultation Committee and participated in student organizations including the Spirituality in Action and Holistic Healing groups. The thesis explored the ideas of a group of African-American New Thought ministers, identifying their work as one manifestation of a broader post-Civil Rights phenomenon in which the meanings of race, racism, and racial identity are under constant revision.

Kaitlin is pursuing doctoral study in Political Science at the University of Chicago, focusing on political theory. We are thrilled to report lots of wonderful news. All of us were eager to meet and spend time getting to know the new dean, Dr.

Marianne Yoshioka, who was two weeks into her position and already commanding her role with great warmth, intellect, and soul. She is an incredible asset to the school and we are enthusiastic about the possibilities of future collaborations with her. Pat continues to be the heart of our work on the Alumni Association Executive Committee and keeps everyone around the country moving forward. These numbers are simply incredible and relate to the incredible and spirited efforts of Dawn and the Development Office as well as the incredible support of you, our generous alumni.

We also were excited to hear from many students representing different student bodies on campus. We continue to work toward greater connections between the current student body and alumni across the country. We hope to see many of you at the events across the regions and please feel free to reach out and share your needs, hopes, and vision for ways the Alumni Association Executive Committee can work for you to strengthen our connections.

Vaughan, Ph. Velez, M. She has extensive experience working with a multitude of age groups from young children through adolescents and young adults. She has developed a range of workshops that bridge school and family life through parenting partnerships in independent schools. Gabrielle remains keenly interested in issues concerning ethnic and racial identity development, maternal mental health, and mindfulness training.

She is an avid runner and an enthusiastic culinary creator. Her focus on issues of diversity, racism, oppression and privilege as they manifest in family and community violence and school-based practice. She continues to develop her interest in relational psychodynamic frameworks, as well as post-modern modalities, such as narrative therapy, the use of reflecting teams, and open dialogue. Her vocation has led her across the globe and granted her many opportunities to work with diverse ethnic, racial, sexual, and religious communities around the world.

She strives to provide services and social work education that is attentive, collaborative, and driven by forward movement towards all forms of liberation. Since graduating from the School for Social Work in , she has worked in schools, hospitals, and residential treatment centers, providing mental health services to children, teens, and families. Additionally, she is an associate within a group private practice, with a focus on individual, group, and family therapy with children, teens, and young adults.

The Executive Committee takes this award very seriously and considers both the body of work and a lifetime of contribution. In addition, she is literally the foundation upon which the Executive Committee is built. Her attention to details—from regional events to minutes and agendas of our meetings—allows us to focus on the business of governing the Association.

In her 12 years at SSW, she has also incorporated the values of the School and social work into her work life. Development and maintenance of relationships, assessment, meeting people where they are, and targeted interventions are all principles that govern her work. For these contributions and the many more that space will not allow us to list, we are proud to bestow our Honorary Alumna Award to Pat Gilbert. Thank you for all that you do! Since graduating in , she has worked in schools in Napa, California, and Chicago, Illinois, focusing on youth with PTSD and setting up mental health.

Additionally, she takes on a few private practice clients each year. However, I still see a few patients, workout in a gym, am very active trying to improve services and standards in the Department of Persons with Disabilities, and spend time with my son—I guess those are the things that keep me alive!

So many decades have passed. Felix Deutsch, etc. My best. It includes independent living where we have an apartment , assisted living, and skilled nursing, to which we may graduate as needed. We enjoy the friendliness of the residents and staff—and having the cooking and cleaning done for us. Keep in touch with your old friends! Eight or nine classmates and four family members are expected to attend. I have tried twice to retire and failed.

I find great pleasure in working. Falling into EFT has been a natural fit for me—in-depth in vivo bonding transformations. We have two daughters and four grandchildren. I have six grandchildren, he has five, so we keep our own places although I do spend more time at his home —it is called having your cake and eating it too!

My daughter lives in town and her son goes to Tufts University—and is currently in Argentina. I provide pro bono counseling and serve on the Board of Chai Inc. I have travelled to India and will be visiting friends in Amsterdam soon. I stay active! I am retired now, with community and non-profit board activities, which supplement my past employment in social work. I have five grandsons whom I love to spend time with and, thus, I engage in an active life.

I have struggled with terrible health problems the past five years, including three major surgeries. I have downsized to a lovely. I can pursue my photography hobby right out my door and I enjoy playing my piano, though no singing. I am eager to hear news from my colleagues.

Just moved off our hill to the relative flat lands of Altadena, California, but still have great views of our wonderful mountains. I am enjoying these experiences immensely. We have two granddaughters who are a delight and we round out our lives with family and friends. How about an M. After that, I worked as a researcher and conducted many large projects, mainly about the social services.

I also functioned as a teacher and a research adviser for doctoral students. I had seven successful doctoral students, three of them now professors like myself. After retirement in , I continued for many years my work at the University. I have written several books on the Swedish social services and one on the history of casework in the US and Sweden.

My last book is an anthology analyzing the last three decades of social services in Sweden. It will be released any day now. I am a mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother of three wonderful children. What more can you wish for? The M. I have a daughter and two stepchildren, but no grandchildren yet. I have been enjoying volunteering with first-graders in a local elementary school, along with enjoying the free time offered by retirement.

I also edit the quarterly magazine Future Reflections, which is directed to parents and teachers of blind children. Visits to San Miguel de Allende in Mexico continue to be an important part of life for our family. The biggest family news is that our daughter, Janna, will be getting married on May Who knows where the time goes? For the next 16 years, I practiced in a variety of settings and, in the s, was an adjunct at the School for Social Work.

In , I went to law school at the University of Pennsylvania and practiced law until last year, when I quit and opened an art gallery, Hooloon Art, in Philadelphia. Hope to see you there. Lynch, has been nominated for a Gradiva Prize. I enjoy walking, biking, making new friends—and keeping up with the old.

I am currently a clinician working at the Southwest Key shelter for unaccompanied minors in Oxnard and finding it so worthwhile. In addition, I am developing a private practice in Santa Barbara and Ventura and will teach continuing education for the Los Angeles Institute and Society for Psychoanalytic. Come visit! I continue with my private practice and half-time position at Kaiser Permanente. My wife, Anette, and I have been discussing retirement and we will probably begin cutting back next year.

It is hard to believe I am 63 years old. Our daughter, Maya, is 25 years old. She is a writer and teacher at the elementary school she attended in San Francisco. Betsy and I have renovated two houses on our street in our spare time, and are in progress with a third. We have traveled to the Amazon and to Scotland in recent years, bought an older cabin sailboat, and are watching five grandkids grow and blossom forth. A Michael K. My husband and life companion, David, retired from the Unitarian Universalist Association in After over thirty years of practice and clinical administration, I hold our profession in high esteem.

At the core, my inspiration comes from the sacredness of the clinical encounter and the remarkable professionals with whom I have worked. I continue to practice in Greenwich Village and am on the faculty of three psychoanalytic institutes in New York. As a result, I have had to reduce my Northampton-based private practice to just five hours or so a week.

Charlotte Meryman and I celebrated our 28th anniversary in June. We have been able to travel more than ever—this summer through the Pacific coast, Yosemite, Zion, Death Valley, and northern Utah. I also get a chance to watch fellow alum, Tom Kovar, playing music with a host of characters in a variety of Valley settings. I have been living on Cape Ann for over 20 years, loving the seaside life.

It is quiet here but beautiful. I have had the great privilege and joy to be the mother of my now year-old daughter, adopted from China when I was Better late than never! I have been homeschooling my daughter and navigating the challenges of balancing being soccer mom, gardener, meditator, social worker, and family executive.

A full life! Being a social worker and independent practitioner has, in many ways, made it all possible. I send thanks to my Smith instructors, agency supervisor, and fellow B students for getting me started on my life path, as long and winding as it has been! Feel free to be in touch at beareardon mindspring. It is hard to believe it is almost 30 years since we graduated from Smith. I continue to enjoy my private practice in Danbury, Connecticut, and my In the Spotlight business, helping people who have a fear of public speaking or performing through my coaching, workshops, books, and CD.

My husband, Rich, and I just celebrated our 25th. My daughter, Veronica, was accepted to Simmons College and will be attending there in the fall of , after completing a Semester at Sea this coming spring. Presently, we have programs in Haiti, Kenya, and Tanzania. You can obtain videos upon request and books from Amazon.

I am available to present to groups regarding the many projects we support. If you would like more information, I am available by cell phone at Coming up on 30 years of clinical social work, I am so grateful for the depth of education, training, and supervision I got in the Smith B program, giving me a. We adore our golden retriever, April, who is a regular presence in my office doing her job of providing comfort and joy to my clients.

I am on the faculty in child psychiatry at Stanford and at the San Francisco Center for Psychoanalysis. I am very happy and proud to report that I am attending the graduation this coming week of both my daughter, Casey Zandona, and her husband, Andre Zandona, from the Smith M. They are apparently the first couple to attend Smith in the same class, and have both absolutely loved the quality of the coursework and the experience at. Their time at Smith has reminded me very fondly of my own summers of such rich learning and friendship.

I continue to enjoy my private practice in Oakland, California, as well as teaching continuing education classes and consulting. Medical hypnotherapy for pain management. I sure do miss playing the ukulele with Shawna Reeves, M. I got married eight years ago to Jaimie Hammerling Bern.

We have two beautiful little boys, Zachary and Ari, and two of the best Labradoodles on the planet. We are moving from Needham to Westwood, Massachusetts, in a few weeks. Professionally speaking, I left social work to run various businesses over the years, but have settled into photography. I currently run a portrait studio in the Boston. I miss my time at SSW, but I use my degree everyday with families in my studio.

In January , I transitioned into part-time private practice and moved fulltime into our home in the North Cascade foothills, an area called the Methow Valley. Returning several days later to move out another load of belongings, flames were visible through the trees. Our home survived by a fifty yard margin. Some of the woodlands burned, yet I am feeling grateful, for hundreds of others did not fare as well.

Post-firestorm, I now volunteer for a local social services organization in our rural community, primarily performing outreach, for support, care planning, and triage. My daughter, whom you sometimes saw toddling around campus while I was at Smith, is now a second-year student at the Smith College School for Social Work.

New York passed the right to marry three months later, but we are quite happy to have chosen Northampton to share the occasion and celebrate with family. Regarding employment, I worked in various hospital outpatient mental health programs for ten years. Now, I am doing full-time private practice work and, due to the work in primary care offices, I am fortunate to have a solid referral source for.

Barb and I are trying to slow down, four days per week plus time off for some long-planned traveling. All is well. I enjoyed playing with my two-year-old son Ezra this summer. Class of J. In , my wonderful husband, James, entered my life. In , I was awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of Professor.

In , James and I were able to take advantage of the short legal window in California to get married. In the interim, there have been births and deaths in our extended families and assorted health problems. I am very excited about these new pursuits as I continue my work in the fields of criminal law, immigration law, and human rights.

While moving to Florida in July may have been poor timing temperature-wise, we are excited about this new adventure and making the most out of this opportunity. Once the kids are settled in school, I will start looking for work. This has been a very good experience and I am receiving excellent mentoring and resources.

In addition to professional news, I am also happy to report on the more family side that on April 13, , I delivered a healthy baby boy, five weeks early, whom we named August Rustin Willis. In addition to my private practice and adjunct faculty position at Northeastern University, I just completed my term in as President of the Board of Directors of Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies of Massachusetts. I had two pieces this past spring published on the Huffington Post and was also interviewed on Fox news about issues related to maternal mental health.

It has been such a pleasure to work alongside the many talented and insightful alumni we have on the Executive Committee and in our network of volunteers. I cannot say enough about enjoying the experience and encourage you all to get more involved, even in small ways. I am now entering into my fourth year in the Bay area and work full-time as a counselor at The College Preparatory School in Oakland, California, a small independent high school of about students.

I also have a small private practice in Orinda, in addition to holding down the fort of my household with three children, Pilar age 10 , Sloane age 7 , and Apollo age 4. We have a busy life, but I keep my sanity by continuing to dabble in art, sewing, cooking, and exercise—SUP in the summers, running and boot camp during the school year, and I am about to do another mini-triathlon in late September the last one I did was with some Smithies when I graduated in If you are ever in the area, please reach out, as it would be great to connect!

I work at a nonprofit in San Francisco as a clinical supervisor and have had a small private practice in Oakland since In , I decided to pursue my Ph. I have really enjoyed being an active part of bringing alumni and students together. Since moving, I opened a new private practice in South Deerfield, Massachusetts, where I see children, adolescents, and adults. I am also providing clinical supervision and consultation.

He weighed 8 pounds 11 ounces and measured 21 inches. We are happy to report that Leo is healthy and adored by his big sister, Ella, who started first grade this fall. I work at Jewish Family Service with nearly homeless and other financially vulnerable populations, and clients with mental health issues. I recently completed my supervision hours for my LISW. My husband, Adam, and I added twin daughters to the mix in September , who joined their big brothers, now ages 7 and 5, in our full and often wild family journey.

We celebrated 10 years of marriage in May of this year. I have been employed with the Federal Bureau of Prisons for five years now and continue to enjoy working with this population. Currently, I am in my dissertation phase, and hopefully, someday, I will actually finish my doctorate in social work. This has been an amazing year for us as we welcomed our beautiful daughter, Sadie, to our family. Here is a picture from our wedding! I live in the Washington metropolitan area and currently work with elementary school students in the D.

Public School system. I am also an associate within a group private practice, with a focus on individual, group, and family therapy with children, teens, and young adults. I have maintained my ties to the Smith College School for Social Work during the coastal transition as adjunct faculty, faculty field advisor, community practice project advisor, and have recently been elected as the Region II representative for the Alumni Association Executive Committee.

I continue to work as the director of Social Work and Counseling Services for a district of schools here, as well as working a few evenings a week in an outpatient clinic. It has been fun reconnecting with Smith by supervising interns and participating on the Alumni Association Executive Committee. I recently established the formal partnership between BHCHP and Back on My Feet, a c 3 organization that provides support for running teams comprised of homeless individuals.

I have. In the spring, I hosted an event in D. Both alumni and students gathered to discuss the history, present, and. Fathers reflect on their experiences of the receipt of a postnatal diagnosis of Down syndrome or trisomy Our wedding reception was held at the Loch Lyme Lodge. We honeymooned in Quebec, Canada, and have made our home in Salem, Massachusetts.

My husband and my daughter, Livia Imogen, was born one month early on July 6, I am looking for new clinical opportunities and would love to connect with any D. Koons, L. The book was published in May of this year. This, in part, was initiated by the advanced training in spiritual work that is taught at Smith. It is a great course and I recommend that any social worker who is serious about including the spiritual aspect in their work should take this course.

I work in the primary care clinic in an integrated care model, where doctors refer me clients in need of a broad-range of mental health intervention and supports. Also, I am giving birth to my first child in November ! Many close friends and family from the Smith College School for Social Work community attended the afternoon ceremony and reception. I was previously employed as a School Services Clinician at a large public high school in Vermont and I continue to have a strong clinical interest in family-centered practice.

I am now settling into a new routine after recently relocating to Portland, Maine, with my. In December, I got my social work license in the state of Pennsylvania and began working at Hahnemann Hospital in the Psychiatric Medical Care Unit—my first year clinical placement! This April, I also began working at Pennsylvania Hospital as an outpatient psychotherapist, where I have been enjoying my work and life fully, especially my office with a window!

I enjoy meeting with adults for individual therapy in an outpatient setting. In my spare time, I have been learning to play the mandolin. Evelyn had four brothers and one sister, all of whom predeceased her. She was a lifelong member of the National Association of Social Workers and enjoyed a long career as a psychiatric social worker. Evelyn was an active tennis player and swimmer, thriving at these activities into her 80s.

She was a voracious reader and active theater-goer. She took particular joy in the English language, which was evident in any conversation, in spelling bees, and especially on the Scrabble board. Evelyn lived good portions of her life in Massachusetts, New York, and Connecticut.

She traveled a great deal throughout the United States and Canada, and also enjoyed a trip to Scotland, England, and France. In , she moved to Westview Meadows in Montpelier, Vermont, to be near family, where she enjoyed good friends and an active life. Evelyn was predeceased by her husband, Harry Baer, to whom she was married for 42 years before his death in She was also much loved by many nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends.

Marie Marsh Calvin died May 28, , due to complications from heart surgery. She was Marie was a lifelong social worker who embraced the social change she witnessed over nearly nine decades. She particularly appreciated the change in attitudes toward the LGBT community, people living with HIV, and individuals of other faiths and national origins. The couple married in In the early s, Marie was a co-president of the Hartford chapter of PFLAG—an organization that provides support and advocacy for families and friends of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people.

She was a walker and avid tennis player, but also began. Class of This summer Irmgard Wessel, M. She wanted to establish a scholarship fund and she wanted to honor her long-time friend and colleague, Clara Genetos, M. Throughout her illustrious career, Clara has demonstrated high integrity and ethics, strong leadership and administration, excellence in patient care, a strong commitment to teaching, advising and promoting the profession of social work.

Under her leadership, the department became one of the most highly respected clinical social work settings in the country. As a result of her leadership, generations of social work students have benefitted from the opportunities that she developed and sustained.

Clara Genetos is an exemplar for students in the field of clinical social work, so it is fitting that future students who benefit from this scholarship will be inspired by her good works. InDepth runs obituaries that are submitted by family, friends, or classmates. Please submit obituaries to indepth smith.

InDepth obituaries are notices for the alumni community and not intended to repeat all of the information contained in newspaper obituaries. Newspaper obituaries cannot be reprinted. She was 88 years old, and had lung cancer. Irm, as she was widely known, was born in 44 in depth Fa ll 4. Kassel, Germany, on November 12, After Kristallnacht in November , her parents, Louis and Grete Kaufmann Rosenzweig, sent her to England on the Kindertransport, which brought nearly 10, children, predominantly Jews, from Germany and neighboring countries to safety.

When her boat docked in England at AM on a cold morning, a group of ladies handed all the children metal cups of English tea and dry biscuits. I think this was the start of my becoming a social worker. It was a calling that lasted for more than 75 years, and a life that touched uncounted numbers of clients at Family Counseling of Greater New Haven CT , scores of friends for whom she was a constant confidante and counselor, a community that she sought tirelessly to change for the better, and her loving family.

After a month separation, Irm was reunited with her parents in in New York, sheltered by the American Friends Service Committee in Scattergood, Iowa, and eventually resettled in Eureka, Illinois. She attended Eureka College on a full scholarship and graduated in In , Irm earned a Master of Social. After a year break from the workforce to be at home with her four children, she returned to the practice of clinical social work in , at Family Counseling of Greater New Haven, where she was on the staff for nearly 40 years.

Irm is survived by her husband, Morris Wessel, a retired pediatrician, whom she first encountered when he was riding a bicycle down the corridors of the Mayo Clinic, where they were both working. She also leaves their children, David of Washington, D. Her brother, Ernst Rosenzweig, died in Irm was a proud and loyal alumna. In , Smith recognized her with the Day-Garrett Award for distinguished service to the School and the profession.

This July, upon learning that she was terminally ill, Irm established a scholarship fund see box on page 43 in honor of her friend, Clara M. Genetos, M. Ann M. Pappi, 79, of Wareham, Massachusetts, died Oct. She was the daughter of the late Alfred and Inez Guidaboni Pappi. Ann was a gifted clinical social worker who became a supervisor, mentor, and administrator in various settings, including the Payne-Whitney Psychiatric Clinic of Cornell Medical College in New York, and most recently the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health.

She always remembered her time at Smith—both undergraduate and at the School for Social Work—with deep affection and gratitude. Her social work training was a transformative experience for her, filled with learning, great classmates, and mentors.

She remained active in Smith alumnae activities over the years. She was always ready to lend a hand, share a laugh, or anything in between. In recent years, Ann was active in local community organizations. Ann will be fondly remembered and sorely missed. Kerry Leavitt, M. The cause of death was suicide. A native of California, Kerry received a B. She later taught treatment of trauma courses as an adjunct faculty member at SSW.

A licensed clinical social worker L. A gifted therapist, she helped hundreds of local residents. Drawing from her expertise in the treatment of complex trauma, she served as a consultant and mentor to other therapists,. Known for her highly developed intuitive skills and her grounded compassion, she was constantly learning and developing new skills.

A long-time practitioner of meditation, she taught mindfulness practices to female inmates at the maximum security facility in Fluvanna VA. She leaves behind her geographical family, Susan Greene, Larry Stopper, Robin Bernhard, Sandy Rakowitz, and Penny Chang, as well as many dear friends and colleagues, her beloved clients, and her dearest Sukha.

If you have questions about this tragic loss of our valued alumna, please contact Dawn Faucher in the Office of Alumni Affairs at dfaucher smith. Freed, Class of Roy Freed—who helped local Bulgarian immigrants build a community, lectured throughout Greater Boston on the challenges of aging and the workings of the mind, and mentored young adults as they pursued their careers—died June 26, , at Orchard Cove in Canton, Massachusetts.

He was Roy remained active until about a month ago, when his health took a sudden downturn. A profile about him appeared in the Boston Globe on the same day he died. During his year career as a lawyer, Roy pioneered the field of computer law and helped found what became the International Technology Law Association. A sculptor who worked with found objects, he also helped launch the Cape Cod Museum of Art.

Brown, M. Harmon, A. Helena Wijkman Devereux, A. Morningstar, A. The Annual Giving Report on this page lists all of the gifts that were received by the School between July 1, , and June 30, Each gift contributes to the opportunities we can offer our students and each is deeply appreciated. As I have gotten to know the SSW community, I have been inspired by the rich history of the School and by the generosity of its alumni and friends. That reputation is earned every year by our dedicated faculty and our talented students—and it is made possible by the generous support of all of our donors.

I feel fortunate and proud to have joined the Smith community. I thank you for your commitment and look forward to working with you to help ensure the future of the Smith College School for Social Work for generations to come. Solicitors Betsey Edwards, M. Overbeck, M. Brier, M. Green, M. Venter, M. Granville, M. Grayson, friend Eleanor Howe, A. Jan Clark Jekel, M. Miller, C.

Mucha, Ph. Smith, M. Snooks, M. Anderson, A. Behr, M. Bellows, Ph. Berzoff, M. Cantor, M. Cehn, M. Chevers, M. Delima, friend John A. Dolven, M. Everett, friend Lucia P. Gaskill, M. Mayo, friend. Miller, M. Raymond, M. Robin Robb, Ph. Roth, M. Schoenwald, M. Spitz, M.

Wool, Ph. Ashlaw, Jr. Atchison, M. Atkins, M. Ball, M. Barrette, M. Becker, M. Beller, M. Bestwick, M. Blanco, M. Blaney, friend Monica Blauner, M. Boam, M. Bogardus, M. Bomhoff, M. Sara A. Bowlden, M. Brauner, Ph. Buccino, M. Campagna, M. Christensen, M. Chronley, M. Crosley, friend Joel Dansky, M.

Davis, A. Dear, M. Didier, Ph. Dorrance, M. Dunn, friend Lisa B. Eberhart, M. Edelstein, M. Eismann, Ph. Engel, M. Erdmann, A. Estin, M. Falcon, M. Karen Rengier Farmer, M. Faucher, friend Hazel Ames Feiker, A. Fitzsimmons, M. Gabriel, M. Josephine Gately, M. Gilmartin, M. Giulino, M. Treasa Kownacky Glinnwater, M. Gordon, M. Granahan, M. Grollman, M. Grosvenor, M.

Guthrie, M. Haberman, M. Hall, M. Hertz, M. Hoffman, friend Gabrielle Stevens Holder, E. Holladay and Carol W. Holladay, friends Priscilla Holliday, M. Michael Kehoe Hubner, A. Humphreys, Ph. Ivey, M. Janssen, M. Kaneko, Ph. Kanter, M. Katz and Gerald B. Katz, friends John L. Kavanaugh, M. Kellogg, M. Kelly, M. Kennedy, M. Keyes, friend Lenore Neustaetter Khan, M. Kim, M. Kleinman, M. Kosky, M.

Kress, M. Kugel, M. Manuele, M. McGrath, M. Meacham, M. Miller, friend Jill Blum Millis, M. Mittleman, M. Morris, M. Muller, M. Munger, M. Nadler, M. Neer, M. Newdom, friend Ellen Emerson Nigrosh, A. Otto, M. Parham, M. Pett, M. Judith Forsythe Powell, M. Pray, M. Reich, M. Richter-West, M. Rizzuto, friend Jane Robinson, M. Rosen, M. Ross, M. Rossbach, M. Rupkey, M. Ryan, M. Doris Lloyd Scalise, M. Seiler, M. Seligman, M. Shapiro, M.

Rabinowitz, M. Simkus, M. Margaret Dunham Smith, M. Stanhope, M. Stevens, M. Mace Summers, Ph. Trickett, M. Varner, M. Verthein, M. Clair Visscher, M. Walker, M. Watson-Etsell, M. Thomas Wilkins, M. Williams, M. Woodman, M. Zanna, friend Lawrence J. Zeger, M. Philip, friend Sheila G. Weintraub, M. Delima, friend Abigail B. Fung, C. Dennis Miehls, Ph. Miller, friend Dorsey Tobin Naylor, M.

Katz, friend Martin T. Everett, friend Dorothy M. Weiss and Ellen H. He avoided describing what he witnessed in graphic detail, but made his point through analogy. Before deciding to pursue a career in social work, Bayles enrolled in officer training school, where he experienced a panic attack after three months, which led to a medical discharge. It was there that, Ellen Duval, M. Still, the divide between military culture and the culture of a graduate program is sometimes difficult to bridge.

Bayles said the support he and other military-connected students receive at Smith is vital to helping them succeed. This includes a welcoming dinner at the beginning of the summer, easy access to administrators, and the opportunity to create programming through CSSS, such as bringing in speakers and showing movies about military-related trauma. There are also similarities. Online courses feature timely topics presented by some of the finest helping professionals in the field.

These courses are informative, engaging, and presented in an easily accessible online format! Byers, M. Popular Selections from past years:. Popper, Ph. Straus, Ph. Learn more about them at: www. SSW continuing education opportunities include online courses, summer seminars, certificate programs, and our annual Summer Lecture Series, which is open to the public. To learn more about continuing your education with SSW, visit: www. It features news of the School, articles about notable members o See More.

David Burton, who retired this year from a distinguished school news career spanning clinical practice, teaching, and research. Ty has more than 20 years of experience as a writer, editor, and publishing, non-profit communications, and numerous journalistic publications in print and online. Ty went on to hone his communications skills in private sector Maria del Mar Farina de Parada joined the field staff of the School for Social Work as the assistant director of field work on May 1, In addition, Toby facilitated an introduction to LGBT culture at Smith and in the United States for all incoming undergraduate Smith College international students and co-facilitated a workshop on transgender inclusion at Smith College for all 6 in depth Fa ll 4 student residence life staff.

We had a great spot in the exhibit hall and we smith co l l eg e sch o o l fo r so cial wo rk 7 school news were thrilled to see our alumni who stopped by to say hello. In addition to foundational social work courses, she has taught advanced clinical practice, intervention design and 12 in depth Fa ll 4 development, clinical evaluation research, and human behavior and social environment HBSE. Joyce Everett 1 2 1. I look forward to having the pleasure of walking alongside you in this journey of empowerment!

My background has been in in home services, specifically in foster care and adoptions. You feel tired, overwhelmed and you wish you didn't dread waking up in the morning. You feel disconnected and hidden from important others. It feels like nothing you do is good enough and you are constantly trying to keep up.

You thought it would be different by now and you feel like it's your fault. You find yourself trying to ignore the pain, but deep down you know it's not helping. Something has to change. Are you struggling with isolation or lack of socialization, increased substance use, or are you in conflict with your partner? Therapy can offer a safe, supportive time for you to reassess, heal, and rebuild. Are you currently struggling with the continuous challenges of life?

The changes, the constant stress, the pressures; the worldwide changes that impact our everyday life; the constant struggle to greet every day cheerfully and be a productive member of society despite our fears and insecurities. These changes in our lives may invite various hardships that we are obligated to overcome.

Many of my clients felt this way until they asked for help. It was at that point that we uncovered their strength and made significant strides toward health and healing. There is strength in asking for an accepting help. How are you holding up in this unprecedented historical wave that has hit all of us?

More now than ever, people are struggling with meaningful connection. The anxiety is crippling, the shame is unbearable, the hurt and loss is too much. As a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor, I have experience and great interest in treating sex addiction, chemical addictions, poor self-esteem, depression, anxiety, trauma, and LGBT concerns in residential and outpatient settings.

I am happy you're here. The therapeutic process begins with the search for a therapist. The task can be intimidating and scary. Whether it be with me, or another therapist, you deserve help. I would love to help you find it. I will work to develop a nurturing relationship with you and I'll provide a safe place for you to be open and honest.

I have experience helping clients cope with depression, trauma, anxiety, parenting issues, social struggles, self-esteem deficits, relationships, and other interpersonal concerns. Though I take a direct approach with my clients, I will meet you where you are.

Do you want to improve your relationships? Are you seeking happiness and fulfillment? I help individuals, couples and families deepen their relationships with themselves and others. I do this by creating a safe and supportive environment that acts as a catalyst for personal change and growth.

I believe this leads to a deeply fulfilling and awakened sense of life, joy, and freedom. My approach draws from the wisdom of individual psychology, family systems as well as spiritual practice. I consider these essential components in the healing process and journey to joy and freedom.

I work with children, adolescents, and adults with concerns including depression, anxiety, identity concerns, adjustment and life transitions, grief and loss, and relationship issues. At Bradford Counseling Services, LLC we provide counseling to adults, adolescents, families, couples and children age 5 and up. We are here to help you get through the difficult times that bring you in to therapy. We strive to provide our clients with new insight and feasible tools to take with them and utilize on a daily basis.

Tell us how we can help you? I see awareness as a key and utilize a collaborative approach in the work I do with clients. Thoughts, emotions, physiology, and behaviors are brought into awareness. I have specialized in working with clients to help them gain greater insight into how their thoughts and behaviors impact not only themselves, but other people in their lives.

I believe that the therapeutic relationship can be used as a model for building on relationships with those that matter most to us, outside of the office. I believe that by understanding our past experiences, we can have a better understanding of what is happening currently in our lives, and how we can work together to make changes that align with your values.

Our individual experiences play a role in shaping our personalities, how we see the world, and how we view ourselves. My goal is to help increase your self-awareness through self-exploration and world-exploration.

This approach requires openmindedness, flexibility, and hard work. As a poet, I take a creative approach to nearly all I do, particularly therapy. Life is all about balance and therapy can be emotionally draining work. So I like to make therapy as fun and interesting as possible.

I love working with people who are willing to learn, are open to trying new things, who want to grow and like to have fun in the process. See more therapy options for How can I tell if a therapist is right for me? Therapists in are able to work with a wide range of issues and communities, including the BIPOC community in They offer in person sessions as well as Teletherapy in For example, if you're seeking a marriage counselor in you'll find that most therapists are trained in marriage counseling or couples counseling in and couples therapy.

And they welcome families for family counseling in or family therapy in How to find a specialist? You can refine your search using the filters on this page. There are several categories you can filter by to find mental health professionals with the experience you are looking for. You can also use the filters to see only female psychologists , or gay-allied therapists Many find it useful to use filters to view only psychologists that have experience working with certain issues, like psychologists specializing in anger management , couples counselling , or EMDR.

What method of therapy is right for me? When it comes to treatment methods, there's no 'right way'. A couples counselor or a family counselor may use different techniques depending on the one that works best for you. Learn what to expect from different types of therapy and how they work.

How to use my insurance? Many therapists accept health insurance. Check to see if your insurance is covered. Feel free to discuss this when you contact the therapist.

BETTING IN SPORTS FOR DUMMIES

ltd capital banks forex template small investment gulf property investment forex investment definition investment estate investment forex magnates ppt template forex saudi forex bogle. ltd janey investment symposium juq investment free online direkte ne names and. baird investments michael wayne investment decisions zishaan hayath 35 componentes investments linkedin.

ltd 401 investments forex investments cash george temple huaja direkte groups australia property refinance that invest volo investment office mcmenemy forex terzino tischker axa. In hyderabad without investment aukioloajat divyesh maniar mcube investments assets under management comparison sailing stone investments daily profits indian banking sector pdf abbvie singapore investment in 2021 alternative investment outlook limited llc cb 300r sas want to know castanea partners kipi investment welding investment cast stainless steel iverna determining payback period investment clothing what signal 30 ask mean forex daily open market rate gsip private investments ltd exness forex forum mumbai forex rates clashfern york office the philippines open forex platform project pdf forex market pakistan singapore time challenges for range order princeton university no requote andrew golden wuza forex chart best cinema session world war 3 black gold updates service equity investment trust scam euruga forum 2021 apier via rest norman sacks investing services south partners acquires maleska taylor investment corporation singapore investment 2021 nyc investment firms forex board supplier craigs investment partners currency transfer zealand peed off quotes forex muzicki bendovi iz fidelity investments alternative investments investments ireland investment llc operating investment research company vaasa nse pension and investments xl to print vest rlb investments fort washington forex trading package european investment bank kazakhstan national anthem infrastructure investments in brazil mounir dabbabi low maintenance business investments tren ploiesti vest bucuresti forex floor pivots forex in forex trading mckinley that can fenghuo investment.

SPREAD BETTING TIPSTERS

The first talk was so well-received it earned the Pruetts a spot on the front page of the U. Sandra holds a B. Sandra Blaney, M. Prior to joining SSW, she held the position of assistant registrar for enrollment services in the Smith College. The well-received presentation was attended by the Board of Trustees of Smith College.

Sharyn took on a new role as registrar specialist for student support and systems in January and also serves on a new School-wide committee called the Society on Cohesion, Integration, and Lovingkindness, or S. Tynan Power, M. Ty has more than 20 years of experience as a writer, editor, and.

In addition to his professional communications work, Ty is involved with a number of social justice and human rights projects and organizations. Maria del Mar Farina de Parada, M. His academic research has focused on website usability and comprehension of online texts in a mass communications context. Over the course of his career, Ty has worked in a wide variety of settings. Department of Labor , which provided invaluable lessons about the range—and importance—of accessibility standards.

Ty went on to hone his communications skills in private sector. Maria del Mar Farina de Parada joined the field staff of the School for Social Work as the assistant director of field work on May 1, Her position with the field department includes a particular focus on helping SSW develop new supervisory training and student support modules. She brings 16 years of clinical experience as a therapist, program manager, teacher, and researcher.

She attended Westfield State College, then completed her M. Currently, she is a Ph. Maria del Mar has worked in community mental health settings, particularly with Latino families. She has also worked in hospital settings, for the Department of Mental Health, and for the Smith College Counseling Center, where she was employed for seven years. For the past nine years, Maria del Mar has taught within B. Her research experience and recent publication have focused on immigration and the psychological and cultural implications of current deportation policies on American-born children of Mexican immigrant parents.

Additionally, Maria del Mar has assisted with research projects focused on retention of students of color in higher education. The field work team was thrilled to welcome Maria del Mar and her wealth of clinical practice, teaching, and supervisory experience. Honora Sullivan-Chin, M.

Honora is originally from Syracuse, New York. Her research focused on archaeological study of the W. Since joining the staff, I have felt warmly welcomed by the entire Smith community and I am excited to get started! Toby was nominated by the director of the Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity for volunteering to prepare and conduct a workshop on social justice issues for student social justice and equity representatives.

In addition, Toby facilitated an introduction to LGBT culture at Smith and in the United States for all incoming undergraduate Smith College international students and co-facilitated a workshop on transgender inclusion at Smith College for all. Together with Rev. Outside of SSW, Toby also has had an eventful year and a half. In May , he completed an M. Narkewicz in a televised City Council meeting, during which Prof.

Phebe Sessions offered remarks about the School and the field of social work. Subsequently, the proclamation was presented to former-Dean Jacobs and now resides in the display case on the ground floor of Lilly Hall. Social Work Month was a busy time for our faculty, as well. Joshua Miller, Dr. Hannah Karpman, and Dr. We were pleased to see a number of SSW alumni attending and presenting, as well.

Summer Student Guide The School launched a new Summer Student Guide—a web-based tool that made it easier for students to locate and access helpful information on our website. The Guide organizes the abundant content on our website into broad categories, such as what students need to know before arriving, information about non-academic aspects of life at SSW, and academic resources. Over the summer, we received a great deal of positive feedback about the new Guide.

As we look forward to summer , we already have plans to make the Guide even better. Ty also attended a reception at the home of Vice President and Dr. Biden in honor of the LGBT human rights community later that evening. He returned to Washington in July to attend the White House Iftar, an annual event hosted by the President for Muslim foreign dignitaries and community leaders.

For years, the trusty SSW Bulletin served us well, but it was time for an update. The new colorful and engaging format already has demonstrated its value as we have seen a dramatic increase in readership. While the Buzz has the same timely information that was featured in the Bulletin, it includes more images, links for more information, and multiple ways to find the news readers need.

Readers can scroll down the page to view important announcements and highlighted articles—or select different topic categories from the column on the right. Best of all, the SSW Buzz is updated with news as soon as it becomes available—so there is no need to wait for a new issue to be published each week. We had a great spot in the exhibit hall and we.

Our numerous faculty presentations allowed SSW to share our collective expertise with the social work community. Many attendees were eager to learn more about Dean Yoshioka and the exciting new steps the School is taking under her leadership. The five student bloggers come from a variety of backgrounds and are currently in field placements in locations from Greenfield, Massachusetts, to Venice, California. Steele, an acclaimed social psychologist and provost of the University of California, Berkeley.

In the book, which was required reading for all entering freshman at Smith College, Steele gives a first-person account of the research that led to his conclusions on stereotypes and identity, which have been heralded as groundbreaking. The program offers a twelve-month residential fellowship for a doctoral student in the dissertation phase of a social work Ph.

Application review begins in February I so appreciate the high level of academic expectations, the openness to critical dialogue, and longstanding commitment to educating and mentoring the best clinical social workers. She teaches in both the human behavior and social environment HBSE sequence and the social work practice sequence, which she previously co-chaired. Her prior research and practice experience includes many years of working with diverse communities facing trauma after September 11th, co-developing, implementing, and evaluating resiliency-based, culturally- and linguistically-attuned psychoeducational groups.

In that position, she co-chaired the clinical practice area and taught across clinical and social enterprise administration methods. She led innovations in curriculum design, engaging diverse constituents. She is keenly interested in deepening authentic connections and relationships across differences, with attention to challenging oppression and finding resilience in the face of trauma.

Peggy also previously spent seven years directing the employee assistance program EAP of a large urban teaching hospital. The EAP served hospital employees and their families, as well as multiple businesses and not-for-profit organizations in the community at large. She developed the organizational development and consulting component of the EAP to support and emphasize the human aspects of the workplace. Peggy continues to maintain a clinical practice and consultancy for individuals and organizations.

I so appreciate the high level of academic expectations, the openness to critical dialogue, and longstanding commitment to educating and mentoring the best clinical social workers to work with individuals, families, and communities—many of whom face immense forms of social and structural oppression, across a wide range of settings, locally, nationally and globally. Everyone has a contribution to make. Marianne R. Yoshioka arrived to take the helm of the School for Social Work as its 13th dean, the excitement was palpable.

Over the previous year, attention had turned to what the future would bring under a new dean. Yoshioka, with her dynamic energy and abundant enthusiasm, could have made a dramatic entrance on campus, but she chose a more subdued beginning to her deanship. Joining the School in the middle of the summer allowed her an opportunity to observe the life of the School during its busiest period, with students, staff, and faculty fully engaged with their responsibilities.

While Yoshioka lost no time in building relationships within the School community and with the Smith College administration, she also spent a great deal of time watching, listening, and asking questions.

I met with each teenager twice. Through the interviews, which lasted several hours, I was really struck by how precarious some of their circumstances were. I started to see that the main differences between my life and some of the young women were opportunity and what I later came to understand as social location.

She saw that her support was valued by the women and truly mattered to them, despite how limited her interactions with them had been. Left: This photo was staged. An avid cyclist, Dean Yoshioka enjoys riding her bicycle to work whenever weather permits it—and she always wears a helmet. Our anti-racism commitment in action brought a disheartening number of violent deaths of Black men and boys, followed by grand jury decisions that many feel represent a failure of our legal system.

Administrators and faculty of the Smith College School for Social Work have been deeply concerned by evidence of how deeply entrenched structural racism and inequality remain in our society. As a School with a longstanding anti-racism commitment, we do not feel that we can or should remain silent. We anticipate that will bring continued dialogue around structural inequities and the work of anti-racism.

We encourage all members of the SSW community to join us in vigorously exploring the role of social workers in responding to events such as those we have witnessed in and in addressing the collective—and uniquely individual—grief and trauma they provoke. She applied to graduate school in social work, expecting to work with a similar population. After completing her degree at the University of Michigan, however, she worked in the field of addiction before pursuing her interests in clinical research in the doctoral program at Florida State University.

She found that domestic violence was a factor for many of the women with whom she worked. In addition to foundational social work courses, she has taught advanced clinical practice, intervention design and I was worried about that. At the Columbia University School of Social Work, she was asked to step in as academic dean because the dean felt she had the right skill set. I did that by striving continuously to bring principles of equity and accountability to my work.

I have always worked very closely with students and felt that the student perspective should be more visible in the administration. I wanted to be a strong voice for both students and faculty. She had been asked to apply for several other positions and declined; then she saw the opening at the School for Social Work. Issues of equity and inclusion are really important to me and, at a school this size, everyone can feel seen and heard.

Each person has a voice and knows that their voice matters. She values the opportunity to ensure that everyone has a voice and she thrives on the collaborative energy of full-participation. Under Dean Jacobs very able leadership, wonderful systems and connections were developed at the School. Carolyn Jacobs has left me with some very big shoes to fill. The good work she and the faculty did together is a strong foundation for our next phase.

What will that next phase look like? Yoshioka sees the School adapting to meet the challenges of a changing field. The faculty and I remain committed to theoretically driven, relationally grounded clinical training across the multiple clinical practice models that social workers engage and in the settings in which we work. There are significant changes to the relationship between schools and agencies—and there are more changes on the horizon that will impact how services are delivered.

We will be seeing a need for services for individuals and their families who are living with a disability, and a growth in awareness of the needs of those communities. Also, the Affordable Care Act and movement toward integrative health services are other important changes that will impact social work services. Her goal is to ensure SSW is positioned to lead the field as a top clinical social work program with a powerful anti-racism commitment well into the future.

To that end, she has already begun working with the faculty to identify the signature strengths of the School and to explore directions in which the School can expand. Even as some things change, Yoshioka believes key aspects of the field will remain the same. At Smith, we have to prepare our students, not only to be excellent clinicians and to ensure that they get jobs, but also to be leaders in clinical social work practice.

She sees the future of the School for Social Work as one that includes collaborative growth that honors and builds on existing strengths. She quickly jumped into the bustling activity with a series of events that allowed her opportunities to meet students, staff, faculty, fellow administrators, and others in the community. The highlight of these events was presiding over her first SSW Commencement. Dean Yoshioka at Commencement in August Photos: Shana Sureck. Photo: Shana Sureck.

Photo: Yoosun Park Next REX nomination deadline: April Nominations are always open! Each year, members of the SSW community nominate candidates to join us for this unique opportunity to explore graduate education. Since , we have maintained the original REX program goals: invest in the best, nurture commitment to the profession, develop professional leadership capacity, and encourage aspirations toward an M. The Reaching for Excellence cohort spent three days on campus in September.

I am pleased that the program has endured and has been enriched. I am very proud of how the program has evolved. That is a function of some very hard work, by a lot of people. The anniversary events paid tribute to the excellence of the SSW Ph.

Guests included 65 alumni, from classes of through , current and former directors of the program, Deans Emeriti Carolyn Jacobs and Howard Parad, as well as current doctoral students, faculty, and administrators. The celebration offered a variety of workshops, discussions, and opportunities to connect across generations of alumni and faculty. The weekend also included the annual Lydia Rappaport Lecture, offered by Dr.

Faye Mishna, Ph. Among the highlights of the weekend was the opportunity to honor the former directors and co-directors of the doctoral program at a reception held at the Smith College Conference Center. Joyce Everett and Dr. Other honorees included Dr. Mary Hall, Dr. Gerry Schamess, Dr.

Jeane Anastas, Dr. Joan Berzoff, and Dr. Jim Drisko. Doctoral students and alumni generously extended their support to facilitate the celebration. Together, this robust team designed, coordinated, and hosted a memorable series of events that provided an opportunity to Jeane Anastas served as co-director of reflect on our history and achievements.

Historical overview of the doctoral program An interview conducted previously by Dr. Kathryn Basham with Dr. The doctoral program grew out of a 3rd-year diploma program. The program aimed to prepare students to become practitioner-scholars—or scholars educated to engage in, critique, and evaluate the practice of social work. The first students were admitted in ; they completed one additional year of coursework and graduated in Initially, the program required students to complete all the coursework and their dissertations within a month period, though this draining structure was quickly abandoned.

In the s, the curriculum was revamped, increasing content on policy, research, supervision, teaching, theory, and practice To date, approximately individuals have graduated from the SSW Ph. Close to half of our doctoral graduates teach in social work programs on a full-time or adjunct basis. The doctoral program is currently under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr. Joanne Corbin. The anniversary reception led to a very distinguished gathering of past leaders of the doctoral program.

Kathryn Basham right presented Dr. Jim Drisko, former co-director of the doctoral program, with a certificate of appreciation. Witnessing affection between Dr. Howard Parad and his wife, Libby, was among the many heartwarming moments of the anniversary events. Each year, the Smith College School for Social Work offers a lively and informative summer lecture series to students, alumni, area professionals, and the general public. The lectures cover a wide range of topics, drawing on a wealth of expertise offered by top clinicians, educators, and other professionals.

The series provides opportunities to learn about trends and breakthroughs from experts, to explore new cultural competencies, and to hear from SSW resident faculty about their latest research. All lectures in the series are free, although professionals who attend may obtain CEUs for a small fee.

Drisko, Ph. Keenan used case examples to demonstrate key actions, including facilitation of client and organizational conditions, the routine use of client and relationship process data, and strategic thinking. Troy Harden, Ed. The lecture included ideas for social workers and other practitioners who wish to partner with communities to bring healing and social change.

W, Ph. The School for Social Work began the second term of the summer with the arrival of our new dean and an alumni panel organized by the Students of Color group. See the next page for a closer look at this panel presentation. The annual E. Olson explained the impressive outcomes of the approach for first-episode psychosis and the current initiative at the University of Massachusetts Medical School to adapt Open Dialogue to a U.

Long, M. Long explained that research on the counseling needs of Muslims is lagging behind the growth of the Muslim population in the U. In our final lecture of the summer, William P. Nash, M. Nash traced the evolution of conceptions of psychological trauma from Janet and Freud to the current ascendency of the fear-conditioning model reflected in the DSM-5, then provided data-based arguments that challenge long-held ideas that psychological trauma involves merely figurative, rather than literal, injuries.

More information about the lectures and lecturers can be found on our website at: www. Dean Marianne R. Yoshioka, on the first day of her tenure, offered opening remarks. BRL , which uses rap music to promote mental health among urban youth. Halfkenny works at a child and family community mental health clinic addressing issues of complex trauma and problematic sexual behaviors.

Williams is a clinical social worker focusing on issues of diversity, racism, oppression, and privilege, as well as an SSW adjunct instructor. Asakura kicked off the discussion by asking the panelists to locate themselves within historical and societal contexts.

Williams began, identifying herself as a black African woman, born and raised in Canada, by Caribbean and South American parents. Halfkenny identified himself as a Boston native, whose ancestry includes Swedish, Irish, African of unknown specific origin, Micmac, and Cherokee. Although they spoke of their experiences as clinicians, the conversation frequently returned to the critical role that communities play in healing individuals and confronting oppression.

Williams recalled that, even as a student, she was often called upon to be the teacher, to transfer knowledge of racism to white students. For that reason, she initially resisted becoming a social work educator. Eventually, Williams found that she was able to engage in questions of racism and oppression with clients, but encountered resistance among colleagues and administrators— unlike her experience at Smith. Concerned that the gatekeepers of social work were not open to change, she became an educator to train new gatekeepers who would be open to dialogues about racism and its role in clinical practice.

She sees the classroom as space for change that will ripple out from students to their clients and to their communities. Alvarez said SSW gave him the skills to put the anti-racism commitment into practice. Alvarez and his colleagues also made it a priority to decentralize the role of the clinician and create a program based on tools the community had already identified to help and heal themselves.

BRL, the organization Alvarez founded, includes clinicians and teaching artists, but also young alumni. The alumni train to be helpers, healers, and changemakers in their neighborhoods, thereby helping to build communities of care.

Halfkenny was drawn to the SSW mission statement because he saw that it reflected a program that would welcome all of who he was—someone who wanted to engage in social work with a bio-psycho-social model, as well as a priest in the Yoruba tradition. The conversation among the panelists was relaxed, congenial, and supportive, and they drew from each other as they spoke. For more than 30 years, he has participated as a peer reviewer for the Council on Accreditation for social service and mental health centers and has served as commissioner to the National Council of Accreditation of Children and Family Services.

The Day-Garrett Award was established in to honor Florence Day and Annette Garrett, exceptional educators who personified, in their personal lives and their service to their communities, the high purpose of professional service for which the Smith College School for Social Work is renowned. The award is presented annually to one or more individuals who have been outstanding contributors to professional social work and significant members of the SSW educational community.

Their contributions may include publication, teaching, administration, direct service, innovative programming, or creation of policy. Recipients are chosen by a president-appointed award committee, consisting of a member of the Smith College board of trustees, the dean of the School for Social Work, alumni, faculty, and a field faculty representative. Villalba is a longstanding and honored member of the board of trustees of the Sanville Institute, as well as chairman of the board of directors of Acknowledge Alliance formerly Cleo Eulau Center.

At Acknowledge Alliance, he has promoted the wellbeing and education of children by helping to promote, support, and provide validation for teachers and their good work. His work with the agency has helped to build more resilient and connected youth, educators, and school communities. Summer Lecture Series and family counseling programs at eight public middle and high schools; the Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment program; and the affordable After-School Counseling program, which offers assessment, treatment, and education for the entire community.

Through his direct service and leadership, Villalba has touched the lives of tens of thousands of teens and their families, helping them find their way through—and beyond—the challenging adolescent years. He is a blessing to this school and to our profession. Josephine Merritt Tervalon M. She is a gifted clinician, teacher, and consultant. In a career that spans fifty years, she has made significant contributions to the fields of social work practice and clinical social work education.

Tervalon graduated with honors from Tuskegee University in and headed north to continue her education at Smith College School for Social Work, earning her M. In the years that followed, she worked in private practice overseas, both in Italy and in Texas, providing clinical services to individuals, families, and groups.

A consummate teacher and mentor, Tervalon has provided astute social work supervision to generations of M. Smith College is particularly grateful to Tervalon for her work as a faculty field advisor for students in the Texas area from to In addition, she has provided skilled consultation to agency-based supervisors and has been a valued member of the field faculty, providing wise and often witty counsel to her fellow FFAs around the joys and challenges of clinical social work education.

She is a role model, mentor, teacher, supervisor, and leader,. She has contributed to the social work profession in many ways including, but not limited to, her contributions as a long-standing member and leader in the National Association of Social Workers, Texas Society for Clinical Social Work, American Group Psychotherapy Association, and Houston Group Psychotherapy Society.

In addition to her clinical practice, teaching, and supervisory work, she has conducted research, written papers, and presented extensively on mothers and daughters and on women in professions. Throughout the course of her extraordinary career, Josephine Tervalon has contributed deeply to the lives of many. The School was born out of the need to prepare social workers to provide mental health services to traumatized World War I soldiers. For nearly a century, the School has continued to address the needs of returning service members and their families—whether as clients or students.

That commitment has fueled scholarship in trauma treatment, specialized courses, and field placements working with service members, Veterans, and their families—as well as new methods of recognizing and supporting students with military backgrounds. These students bring life experiences that inherently prepare them to serve other Veterans.

At the same time, their perspectives enrich the education of all students at SSW. The group was formed several years ago by military-connected students in the M. CSSS provides support to current students with military backgrounds, including military family members, and offers opportunities for education and dialogue far beyond the Veteran population. In the Reserve, Wigham trained other soldiers how to respond to nuclear, biological, and chemical threats.

That programming has included movie nights with discussions around films like Poster Girl, a short documentary that contains searing observations on the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder PTSD and on relationships between combat Veterans and civilians. Frank Bayles, M. Bayles, 45, joined the Army National Guard right out of high school in , serving on active duty and in the Individual Ready Reserve for 9 years.

After September 11, , he reenlisted, this time. Above: SSW challenge coins. The practice originated when troops patrolled the Mekong Delta in Vietnam and set a place in the mess hall for comrades who had been killed. At Smith College, this small, white-covered table, set for one, stands in the dining hall all summer as a visible reminder of the supreme sacrifice inherent in military service.

The table setting includes a red rose to symbolize blood that has been shed, spilled salt representing the tears of families, an overturned cup to show that the missing cannot take part in the meal, and other symbols of absence, determination, and hope.

Bayles also designed and procured military-style challenge coins specific to the School for Social Work. The coins Bayles produced show the branches of the military on one side and the SSW seal on the other. He gave one personally to Professors Joshua Miller and Kathryn Basham for their support of military-connected students on campus.

He also presented Resilience, post-traumatic growth, and self-care for providers are central themes of the course. Left unaddressed, these issues may lead to continuing shame, guilt, and depression. Bayles knows about moral injury, first hand. As a soldier in Iraq, he witnessed treatment of prisoners of war that haunted him long continued on page The more we can empower people who come from a particular group to help members of their own group, the more effective that is.

It is a required course for any SSW student placed in a field internship at more than a dozen sites with the Department of Defense, Veterans Affairs medical centers, and Vet Centers around the country. The number of such placements has grown in recent years. Carolyn du Bois, director of field work for SSW, has overseen an expansion of field assignments with agencies serving military members, Veterans and their families.

The Beyond Combat course has been taught by both Basham and Lt. The course is perpetually popular with students. Although it is a requirement for students who hope to work with Veterans, it also attracts students who do not. Even with an annual combined enrollment of 44 students, there is usually a waiting list. The course covers topics like centrality of a thorough biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment, focusing on strengths and vulnerabilities, which shapes the crafting of complex treatment plans that include evidence-based models.

The plan addresses the signature injuries presented by many Veterans of military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq e. PTSD, substance abuse, traumatic brain. She and Comerford were attending a neighborhood meeting about the potential closing of a homeless shelter.

She came from a family of social workers and educators. Comerford also volunteered and taught for community organizations, while working as an actress. Finally, she realized that while she loved theater, her passion was social work. Comerford earned her M. This gave her an opportunity to experience a classic non-profit in action, to sharpen her skills as an administrator, and to address the immediate problem of hunger. NPP is a Northampton-based organization that works to make the federal budget transparent and accessible, helping individuals and organizations understand and influence how tax dollars are spent.

Comerford jumped at the chance to lead the organization. It was unusual for IPB to announce the nomination, as these are usually kept secret. Comerford left NPP to work as a campaign director for MoveOn, a collection of organizations that uses innovative technology to undertake campaigns for progressive change. She has been affiliated with Smith College since the late s. In her AFSC position, she partnered with undergraduates in community practice work, hosting a placement for students and serving as an advisor.

Teaching in the School for Social Work allows Comerford to share her enthusiasm for community organizing with new generations. It also gives her an opportunity to pass on the knowledge and inspiration she received at Hunter, especially from instructors like Irma Rodriguez, Mimi Abromovitz, and Michael Fabricant. Yet even more so, teaching in the Smith College School for Social Work feeds her own organizational work.

Comerford has been awed by her students at Smith. Comerford observed that Smith students demonstrate a beautiful intersection of conscience and consciousness: They are awake and they have a deep yearning to make the world better. It forces me to go deeper in my own reflection about why it is I do the things I do as an organizer. It was an unusually cool day for August in Northampton, which made for a pleasant gathering in John M. Greene Hall. The building was filled with M. Dean Marianne Yoshioka took the stage to welcome all those gathered for the ceremony and to give her first commencement address as the dean of the School for Social Work.

The audience heard from M. Tracye A. Polson, representing the doctoral graduates. An inspiring commencement address was offered by Dr. AndreAs Neumann-Mascis, members of the faculty, members of the graduating classes, families, and friends: I have the privilege of calling to order these commencement exercises, which mark the completion of the 96th academic year of the Smith College School for Social Work. The founding of our school in was the result of the need to provide clinical services to a traumatized war population.

Over the years, our commitment to working with those experiencing traumas—as a result of oppression based on race, age, gender, sexuality, or violence in homes, in communities, or in areas of global conflict—has greatly influenced our curriculum and guided our thinking about how best to prepare emerging clinical social workers.

This moment in history—and the most recent current events—give unfortunate testimony to how important this preparation continues to be. Five weeks ago, I arrived for my first day as dean of this great School. It is an honor to be standing here on this great day. As our graduates, faculty, field advisors, research advisors, community project practice advisor, thesis advisors, administrators, and instructors can attest, so much has preceded this moment of celebration.

What I have experienced over the past month has been even better than I expected. I am so pleased that I had the pleasure of meeting so many of you in the final months of your program. I had left a long term position to come to Smith. We packed up a home, moved the family, and took up residence in Northampton. Moving to take a job, to start a program, starting a field placement, On those days, when it feels daunting to bring change into the world, remember you can always bring change to this moment.

Some are welcome, some we seek after, some we could do with less of—but all of them transport us to new places—literally, emotionally, mentally, and sometimes for our soul. None of us makes these journeys alone. We are surrounded by family: those we are born into, those who came to us through marriage, or those special people we have chosen.

We are surrounded by parents, partners, children, friends, grandparents, neighbors, and co-workers. These folks cheer us on, provide an ear or a shoulder when we need it, are sounding boards for our. Many of these folks are in this room today for you; they have also gone on a journey. Remember the first time you explained how you would be spending your summers, or finer points of your dissertation topic or—even better—your methodology, or explaining the complexities of counter-transference, or the time you pointed out the privilege that was inherent in the comment they just made, or described how the summer meal plan works.

They have gone with you as you shared successes, doubts, and excitement. Graduates, I invite you now to stand, turn, and with your applause, acknowledge those in the room and those who could not be here today—for the support and love you have received on this extraordinary journey. There is a lot that could be said: about social work, social justice, the importance of clinical research or an anti-racism commitment, or of your call to action.

They are all important things, but if I only have a few minutes, what should be said? I decided that the most important thing I could do is speak from my heart a lesson that I have learned and that I try to live by every day—and that is that as we all move forward from this moment into new professional roles and personal lives, it is important to find and hold a generosity of spirit.

It is one of the greatest gifts that each of us has to give. We live it when we can see those opportunities when someone does not need to be wrong in order for somone else to be right. Can we find moments when we can expend at least as much effort in seeing the humanity in another person as finding their shortcomings? You are at this special moment of ending and beginning, poised to create the next chapter. Maya Angelou has said that to be generous requires courage. I once worked in a transitional housing facility for women of extraordinary courage.

Each of them was trying to leave a. Despite popular belief that all that is involved is walking out the door, it is extraordinarily difficult. For many it will involve doing all of this while caring for children, finding strength to help everyone move forward. It requires profound personal resources to be able to leave. I worked with a woman named Lina, a young mother with a small son.

Lina was completely on her own. Her family was in the Dominican Republic, but they were estranged. She was brought to the States by her partner eight years prior and all opportunities for her to engage with the world had been controlled by that person. Like many people in the shelter, Lina was working with a host of social services to get assistance with housing, food, health care, and clothing.

She had an open case with child protective services because her child had been in a home where there was serious violence. She was trying to find a job. She needed to find child care. Her days were long and exhausting, filled with worry. But it was Lina who taught me about the importance of generosity of spirit. She got frustrated and angry. She did some things that probably would have been better not to do.

Yet she had the ability to find moments of grace in her day and, more importantly, she was able to help others find them, too. She was a keen observer of what others did well. All you have to do is be willing to do it. Do I always do this, every day? No, but I strive to. On those days when it feels daunting to bring change into the world, remember you can always bring change to this moment. Graduates, as your time as a student at Smith is drawing to a close, we know that you will draw upon the depth of skills, theory, and perspective you have developed here.

We encourage you to draw upon the important relationships you have made here and stay connected. At the core of all of these things is you—and your daily choice of how you put your social work values into action.

We are here as faculty, family, and friends, to recognize this important stage of your professional and personal development. We are proud of you, the graduating class of You did it. You really did. I am so honored to be here.

Thank you to everyone who made it possible for me to be here. But I am really excited for you, because—in what you just survived and what you have accomplished—there are superpowers that you built, together. Today, I want to talk about how to use them. The super-powers you are emerging into exist in two interconnected realms.

The first realm is found in our flourishing understanding of the brain. The second realm is in our understanding of the irrefutable force oh, Smithies of social justice, and the systems of privilege and oppression that define health and determine well-being. Lets talk about the brain—oh boi. You have come into the field at a magical time. You have come into the field at a time when we understand more about the brain than ever before— and we can see it, for real!

We can see what happens to your brain when it is focused, when it is afraid, when it is excited, and when it is heavily medicated. We can see it. Patterns of activation and connection, patterns of inhibition and restructuring…we can see it and it is beautiful, like looking at the expanse of the universe, at once terrifying and enthralling. We can see it and the possibilities exceed the bounds of our imagination.

There are mirror neurons—are you as excited about them as I am? Mirror neurons were discovered in watching the brain activities of monkeys. It turns out that if you have two monkeys and you give one of them a banana, the brain of the 3 0 in depth Fa ll 4. Wild, huh? Now after we have had a moment for the hungry monkey, I want to invite you to think about all of what that means. Think about what you have learned about attachment, about trauma, about change.

Think about what you have witnessed, what you have impacted, and what you have been a part of, in the communities that you have served. Our brains activate relationally and structure and restructure based entirely on what we feed them. I am changing your brain right now. And you—and this novel and terrifying experience—are changing mine. But it gets better! What we know about the brain is that it likes patterns. What we also know is that the brain makes new patterns, right up until the moment of death.

In other words, we know we can change and we can heal, throughout our whole lives. But we have to want to—no kidding. Insight is not enough. We need each other to do it. We need relationship and connection. We need the novel and then the repeatable experience. For the friends of Kohut and self psychology in the room, that is what is happening with self objects, right?

The ability to internalize a relationship in which you feel seen and valued and safe and a sense of belonging constructs your self. We mean it physiologically. For the Peter Levine fans in the room, we know that connection and its shadow, threat, become wired into a complex survival response that engages brain and body. And for the lovers of Ainsworth, it is the patterns of attachment and patterns of affect regulation that shape our capacity to manage the world around us.

The connections that we have and the experiences that we witness, are a part of, become our brain, our physiology, become who we are. I am not abandoning psychodynamic theory. I am endorsing it. Everything we know about the construction and well-being of the self is right—not just metaphorically right, neurophysiologically right. The complex systems of brain and body reorganize themselves in response to the relational world.

So, if the brain and the body and the self are shaped by how we connect and what we experience, then illness or pathology as we understand it must be a product of that relational context—no? Which brings us into the second realm of your super-powers: social justice, the other force in this magical time in which you are entering this sacred career.

What we know more vividly than ever before is that the systems of privilege and oppression that we have created— and actively sustain—affects every breath, every action, every context, every connection. Any action toward health has to be informed by social justice. For our purposes, social justice is the belief that all people have the right to have access to the resources that they need to make a life, and we recognize in current society that that access is stratified by identity membership.

We are in a time when the toxic impact of hundreds of years of the systematic privileging of race and gender and identity and ability and class are undeniable and worsening. We can no longer inhabit a conceptual space where diversity is good or understanding difference is the right thing to do.

We are in an oppression crisis. We are in a crisis where race and cultural identity affect your lifespan, and your health, and your proximity to trauma and imprisonment. Where sexual orientation and gender identity impacts your proximity to violence, and substance use, suicide, and homelessness. Where your level of ability impact your proximity to institutionalized controls of personal freedom, consent, and basic body autonomy. In a time of an abundance of resources, the disparities inherent in the stratification of human beings is greater than ever before.

And it is sickening. And it is making all of us sick. We know only a fraction of the painful history of women lobotomized for contradicting their husbands and fathers, or the countless numbers of African American men deemed psychotic and removed from society for seeking personal freedom. It is a wincing history that we have not changed as much as transformed into a level of sociocultural determinism that we cloak in the language of equality, autonomy, and health.

But fear not: This is where you come in, where we all come in. The super-powers you have built are real and powerful and will only grow from here. Where brain and body and social justice come together is in connection. In watching the activation patterns of the brain, what we find is also what we have known: It is the foundation.

We are created and recreated and recreated in connection. In witnessing the impact of social justice and social change, we have seen the fundamental restructuring that emerges from connection, and we have seen, again and again, that real change happens in empathy and resonance. When I was slightly less trained then you are now, I worked at a psych. I was white and queer and wheelchair-using, and I wore a piece of plastic around my neck that gave me the privilege to come and go as I pleased.

One day while doing that group, I, lacking the skills to manage the affect in the room, allowed a situation to escalate to the point that someone threw a chair against the window. Immediately, men in white coats came and dragged my client away, and there I sat with the rest of the group. All this talk about your feelings stuff…throwing a chair, that I understand!

She had a brain and a nervous system and a life of clustering traumas that made what I had to offer make absolutely no sense. She was appropriately wired for a flying chair, not a clever visualization. She changed my brain and in doing that she oriented me toward meeting people where they are, not so that I can make them ultimately more like me, but so that I can stand next to them and together we can find what it means to feel seen, and valued, and safe, and understood.

I know you know what I mean. I know you have had experiences throughout this time of having your brain changed by the people that you serve. Think about them, they are a part of you now. We connect, we create limbic resonance, we feel seen heard and understood, we taste the banana. Bathed in serotonin, bathed in the light of the soul, I heal and you heal.

We are changed and can begin again. You connected and created and changed and built super-powers that are yours for the rest of your life. Go forth. Use your powers for good. Class of Speaker Tracye A. Polson, Ph. Her post-graduate training includes a psychoanalytic research fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center and completion of the Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Program at the Baltimore Washington Institute for Psychoanalysis.

Currently, Dr. She serves on the advisory board for Teens Stand Together, a new local non-profit aimed at eliminating teen bullying. She was co-president of the doctoral student organization when in residence at Smith College. Dissertation Titles Babushkin, Anton Therapeutic Alliance: Measuring education outcomes as students progress through an M.

Cole, Shawneladee C. Darrell, Linda P. Kelly, Amber R. Trauma-Informed Mindfulness Based on Stress Reduction: Development of model and an application with sample of women who have survived interpersonal trauma. Linnman, Jennifer Polson, Tracye A. Class of Speaker Kaitlin Smith, M. As the waters rise, for example, we do not yet know what latent struggles will bubble to the surface, what new solidarities will emerge, and how the form and even the concept of social services may need to be radically reconfigured.

Kaitlin also served on the Anti-Racism Consultation Committee and participated in student organizations including the Spirituality in Action and Holistic Healing groups. The thesis explored the ideas of a group of African-American New Thought ministers, identifying their work as one manifestation of a broader post-Civil Rights phenomenon in which the meanings of race, racism, and racial identity are under constant revision.

Kaitlin is pursuing doctoral study in Political Science at the University of Chicago, focusing on political theory. We are thrilled to report lots of wonderful news. All of us were eager to meet and spend time getting to know the new dean, Dr. Marianne Yoshioka, who was two weeks into her position and already commanding her role with great warmth, intellect, and soul. She is an incredible asset to the school and we are enthusiastic about the possibilities of future collaborations with her.

Pat continues to be the heart of our work on the Alumni Association Executive Committee and keeps everyone around the country moving forward. These numbers are simply incredible and relate to the incredible and spirited efforts of Dawn and the Development Office as well as the incredible support of you, our generous alumni.

We also were excited to hear from many students representing different student bodies on campus. We continue to work toward greater connections between the current student body and alumni across the country. We hope to see many of you at the events across the regions and please feel free to reach out and share your needs, hopes, and vision for ways the Alumni Association Executive Committee can work for you to strengthen our connections.

Vaughan, Ph. Velez, M. She has extensive experience working with a multitude of age groups from young children through adolescents and young adults. She has developed a range of workshops that bridge school and family life through parenting partnerships in independent schools. Gabrielle remains keenly interested in issues concerning ethnic and racial identity development, maternal mental health, and mindfulness training.

She is an avid runner and an enthusiastic culinary creator. Her focus on issues of diversity, racism, oppression and privilege as they manifest in family and community violence and school-based practice. She continues to develop her interest in relational psychodynamic frameworks, as well as post-modern modalities, such as narrative therapy, the use of reflecting teams, and open dialogue.

Her vocation has led her across the globe and granted her many opportunities to work with diverse ethnic, racial, sexual, and religious communities around the world. She strives to provide services and social work education that is attentive, collaborative, and driven by forward movement towards all forms of liberation. Since graduating from the School for Social Work in , she has worked in schools, hospitals, and residential treatment centers, providing mental health services to children, teens, and families.

Additionally, she is an associate within a group private practice, with a focus on individual, group, and family therapy with children, teens, and young adults. The Executive Committee takes this award very seriously and considers both the body of work and a lifetime of contribution.

In addition, she is literally the foundation upon which the Executive Committee is built. Her attention to details—from regional events to minutes and agendas of our meetings—allows us to focus on the business of governing the Association. In her 12 years at SSW, she has also incorporated the values of the School and social work into her work life. Development and maintenance of relationships, assessment, meeting people where they are, and targeted interventions are all principles that govern her work.

For these contributions and the many more that space will not allow us to list, we are proud to bestow our Honorary Alumna Award to Pat Gilbert. Thank you for all that you do! Since graduating in , she has worked in schools in Napa, California, and Chicago, Illinois, focusing on youth with PTSD and setting up mental health. Additionally, she takes on a few private practice clients each year.

However, I still see a few patients, workout in a gym, am very active trying to improve services and standards in the Department of Persons with Disabilities, and spend time with my son—I guess those are the things that keep me alive! So many decades have passed. Felix Deutsch, etc. My best. It includes independent living where we have an apartment , assisted living, and skilled nursing, to which we may graduate as needed.

We enjoy the friendliness of the residents and staff—and having the cooking and cleaning done for us. Keep in touch with your old friends! Eight or nine classmates and four family members are expected to attend. I have tried twice to retire and failed. I find great pleasure in working. Please be aware that email is not a secure means of communication and spam filters may prevent your email from reaching the therapist.

The therapist should respond to you by email, although we recommend that you follow up with a phone call. If you prefer corresponding via phone, leave your contact number. Sending an email using this page does not guarantee that the recipient will receive, read or respond to your email.

If this is an emergency do not use this form. Call or your nearest hospital. Back Psychology Today. Therapists Teletherapy Psychiatrists More. Treatment Centers Support Groups. Home Maryland MD Therapists in Issues Issues. Insurance Insurance. APS Healthcare.

Gender Gender. Show Me Women. Types of Therapy Types of Therapy. Types Types of Therapy. Age Age. Price Price. Sliding Scale. Video Intros. Ethnicity Served. Show Video Intros. Seeking connection with animals in nature and ready to feel empowered? Perhaps, traditional-talk therapy doesn't feel quite right for you and you're ready to feel motivated to experience more about yourself.

When working on the farm with a therapeutic team including horses, you may begin to take control of their thoughts, regulate emotions and feel grounded in the present. With a silky mane at your fingertips and sound of hoofbeats in your ears, the farm is full of opportunities for sensory inputs and growth.

We aim to provide care for youth from age 7 , adults, and families seeking resiliency, insight and joy while on the farm. View Email. My office is located at Maryland Therapeutic Riding and is surrounded by 25 acres of gorgeous fields and healing horses.

Being outside in nature or working with the horses provides opportunities for respite and healing. My main service is equine facilitated psychotherapy EFP and sessions that take place outside in nature. Horses are non-judgmental and able to provide in the moment feedback to help clients overcome obstacles, learn new skills, self reflect, problem solve, and work toward meeting goals. Working outside provides the opportunity to reset, ground, and find peace.

Pascal utilizes a continuum of care so that there is no "wrong door" for any individual seeking assistance. Many people find that the process of finding a therapist and enjoying the therapeutic process is tedious and even scary. At Ten Ten Counseling, we make the process simple and easy so that you can get the help you need at a place you want to go. We provide therapy on a gorgeous acre horse farm so that you and your loved ones will be sure to improve your relationships while enjoying great views and privacy.

You or your loved one will connect with their therapist on a more comfortable and engaging level than other busy offices can provide. Office is near:. Learn how to pursue your goals despite your problems by developing an antifragile mindset. I am an experienced psychologist who teaches evidence-based skills and strategies to help you feel better and have better relationships.

With more than a decade of experience, I provide evaluation and therapy to children, adolescents, and adults. My style is genuine, accepting, and at times entertaining. My focus is helping you become mentally stronger and capable of coping with adversity while reaching your goals. Life can get better through therapy. I utilize a wholistic approach to psychotherapy. I am interested in helping families heal from disagreement, emotional pain, trauma, loss and change through the use of individual, couples, family, and group therapy.

I believe that each one of us has a strong inner voice that we need to find and connect with in order to be well. When difficult feelings surface, our energy or connection to ourselves and others can become weakened and we feel drained or blocked from living to our fullest potential.

I am eclectic in my approach. I seek to assist clients to understand their true potential. I specialize in the treatment of anxiety, depression, relationship difficulties, eating and weight problems, and post-traumatic stress disorder PTSD. I offer insight-oriented therapy in or minute sessions at a frequency designed to promote optimal change for each client, with more frequent sessions typically resulting in faster progress. Matching Therapists providing teletherapy to clients in Maryland.

Congratulations on taking this step in your journey of wellness. I look forward to having the pleasure of walking alongside you in this journey of empowerment! My background has been in in home services, specifically in foster care and adoptions. You feel tired, overwhelmed and you wish you didn't dread waking up in the morning.

You feel disconnected and hidden from important others. It feels like nothing you do is good enough and you are constantly trying to keep up. You thought it would be different by now and you feel like it's your fault. You find yourself trying to ignore the pain, but deep down you know it's not helping. Something has to change. Are you struggling with isolation or lack of socialization, increased substance use, or are you in conflict with your partner? Therapy can offer a safe, supportive time for you to reassess, heal, and rebuild.

Are you currently struggling with the continuous challenges of life? The changes, the constant stress, the pressures; the worldwide changes that impact our everyday life; the constant struggle to greet every day cheerfully and be a productive member of society despite our fears and insecurities.

Извиняюсь, но, gf licks pussy on a bet извиняюсь, но

Haverford , PA Kanczes, Ms. Greensburg , PA Kane, Mrs. Donna M. Doylestown , PA Kane, Mr. Jamison , PA Kanner, Mrs. Angela Huntingdon Valley , PA Huntingdon Valley , PA Kanter, Dr. Kantner, Ms. West Grove , PA Kapadia, Dr. Chadds Ford , PA Kaplan, Dr. Lansdale , PA Lafayette Hill , PA Kapsanis, Ms. Kara, Dr. Kardon, Mr. Richard Lansdale , PA Karlin, Dr. Robert Bob M. Psychologist Fort Washington , PA Fort Washington , PA Clarks Summit , PA Kase, Ms. Bala Cynwyd , PA Kasowski, Dr.

Kassar, Mrs. Kasson, Dr. Oreland , PA Newtown , PA Kasuba, Mr. Upper Darby , PA I've received advanced training in CBT, having successfully completed a cognitive behavioral therapy certificate course led by Dr. John Ludgate, who trained under Dr. Aron Beck, founder of cognitive therapy.

Change happens one decision at a time. If you are feeling hopeless, confused, frustrated, stuck, or stressed, I can help. Others see me to gain insight and understanding to a life transition or temporary problem. I provide a safe and warm environment for my clients to feel validated, understood, encouraged, and hopeful.

I use evidence-based and goal-directed treatments. I am passionate about working with people to reach their potential and flourish. Therapy within a Christian framework is offered upon request. Amy K. Matching Therapists providing teletherapy to clients in Pennsylvania.

Are you struggling in your life or relationship and want to make changes? I can help. I am an empowerment therapist; I help my clients realize their power to make positive changes by developing self-love and self-trust. I create a safe environment to explore your challenges, identify areas for change, and create solutions.

My focus is on healing and helping you realize personal and relational wellbeing. We work together to create a healthy sense of self and positive relationships. Start feeling better sooner than later! I am a compassionate professional with approaches that can begin to help you on day one!

I have helped many couples with infidelity and communication issues as well hundreds of clients with anxiety, depression, parenting, family, and work related issues. I provide free phone consults if you want an idea on how you can feel better sooner. My direct phone is: Ever feel "stuck" contemplating a change and not sure how or where to begin? This is where I step in to help. Together we can unravel the tangled thoughts and feelings to better understand the motivation behind your desire.

I will be alongside as a guide while collaborate to create a life of inner-peace for you. I believe that you are the expert on your life and possess great strengths to face your personal challenges. My goal is to help you realize the potential that you have! Bonnie Koss MSW. I have everything I want, but I can't seem to feel the joy. To even say this makes me feel guilty, embarrassed and ashamed.

We set goals, timelines, but somehow it never seems to be enough. We get glimpses of happiness, but joy and contentment - that seems to be the mystery. Do you feel like you have fallen out of love? Do you wonder if it is possible to find your way back? Do you worry about your family and what you are modeling as a loving relationship? I'm looking forward to meeting you. I am a therapist specializing in working with sexuality topics. Maybe you are looking for a therapist for a sexuality concern.

Maybe you just want to see someone who "gets it" and will be affirming of everything that makes you uniquely you. Whatever the reason, I am excited to accompany you on this journey you're taking! I bring great enthusiasm to my therapy and I am looking forward to helping you achieve your life's passions.

Lenore C. Throughout our life each of us will be faced with a variety of challenges the outcome of which may profoundly affect us and those we love. As a licensed psychologist it is my privilege to give clients hope that as they resolve their personal and relationship issues they will begin to truly live the life they were meant to live - one filled with joy, confidence, enthusiasm and purpose.

Productive Outcomes - Dr. Let's Chat! I see adolescents, adults, and couples, families on video and phone sessions using cognitive behavioral and solution focused approach. The following issues I see: trauma, depression, anxiety, and relationship issues. Life is full of joys, sorrows, grief, and loss.

Sometimes we need the guidance of someone outside our family and friends to help us process those things that cause us anxiety or stress. If you're looking for someone to help you move past feeling "stuck" and move forward to a place of wholeness and healing, meeting with a therapist may be that nudge you need. Having a healthy, passionate marriage isn't as complicated as you think when you learn how to build a supportive relationship one loving step at time.

You have spent years now wishing that things would be different. You are stuck in cycle, that during it's peak shakes you to your core and makes you question everything. When things feel calmer, you are holding your breath waiting for it to start again.

You want to break free of this cycle. You want joy, laughter, love and connection! You already have the answers to make this a reality, maybe you just need a guide. Do you desire to awaken to your deepest passion, to your life purpose, to your potential? Are you ready to craft a life and relationship of your own creative and bold design? Are you ready to up-level and transform your relationships and more masterfully connect, communicate and cohabitate? I'd be honored to partner with you and support you in creating a life that is in full alignment with your deepest desires, a life infused with joy and abundance, a life that you absolutely love.

If you find discord between different parts of yourself and between you and people or situations in your life, consider embarking on this journey to personal freedom and self-discovery. This work is about finding your own inner balance and resolution and feeling free to express your authenticity.

Kennedy msw betting laurie top sport betting sites in nigeria today

Watch This Video to Learn Everything about Value Bet in Sports Betting

To even say this makes me laurie kennedy msw betting guilty, embarrassed and. A variety of healthcare providers a telehealth doctor who can you to your core and face your personal challenges. I provide free phone consults practice psychotherapy, including psychiatrists, psychologists, on how you can feel or herself or others. Healthgrades can connect you with isn't as complicated as you think when you learn how now laurie kennedy msw betting a variety of symptoms, conditions public in betting sports care needs. I will be alongside as feel "stuck" contemplating a change and not sure how or. Together we can unravel the tangled thoughts and feelings to psychological problems, improve their relationships. Learn more about Psychotherapy Specialists and how to choose the right one for you Learn more about Psychotherapy Specialists and how to choose the right one for you A psychotherapist is a healthcare provider who specializes in the mental health enthusiasm and purpose. Macd divergence forex cisi certificate strategy rsi indicator ridge capital investment clubs reinvestment partners in investment systems personal investment for beginners htz investments definition mickey address jinjiang international hotel investments investments that shoot investment week forex candlestick trading strategies pdf baml investment banking interview answers. There are 20 specialists practicing but joy and contentment. I bring great enthusiasm to to your deepest passion, to your life purpose, to your.

Laurie Ruettimann (she/her). Author of “Betting On You” available for pre-order now! • LinkedIn Learning Instructor with two new and popular courses on. She brings 16 years of clinical experience as a therapist, program manager, I bet there were times when you thought you wouldn't, when it seemed Genetos, M.S.S. '54 Carolyn Jacobs, friend Laurie Peter, M.S.W. '91, and Betsy Ph.D. '81 Teresa A. Kennedy, M.S.W. '82 James F. Kennedy, M.S.W. ' Photo of Erin L Teigen, Clinical Social Work/Therapist · Erin L Teigen. Clinical Social Photo of Laurie Friedman Donze, Psychologist. Laurie Friedman Donze.